Concentration of matter and action of enzymes in coacervates
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Concentration of matter and action of enzymes in coacervates

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Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration; for sale by the Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information, Springfield, Va. in [Washington] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Coacervation.,
  • Enzymes -- Industrial applications.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby T. N. Yevreinova.
SeriesNASA TT, F-525, NASA technical translation ;, F-525.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTL507 .U745 no. 525
The Physical Object
Pagination222 p.
Number of Pages222
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4066301M
LC Control Number79604268

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Full text of "CONCENTRATION OF MATTER AND ACTION OF ENZYMES IN COACERVATES" See other formats 1. Author(s): Evreinova,Tatiana Nikolaevna Title(s): Concentration of matter and action of enzymes in coacervates. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: [Washington] National Aeronautics and Space Administration; for sale by the Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information, Springfield, Va. [] Description: p. illus. Language: English MeSH: Enzymes/analysis Concentration of matter and action of enzymes in coacervates [] Evreinova, T. N. (Tatʹi͡ana Nikolaevna) [Washington] National Aeronautics and Space Administration; for sale by the Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information, Springfield, Va. []?q="Enzymes+Industrial+applications."&search.   •The word enzyme is formed from two Greek words: en means inside and zyme, which means yeast i.e., the word enzyme means inside yeast. •There are many methods for naming enzymes: 1-The old trivial name as pepsin and trypsinThe name of substrate and the suffix –ase added to it as lactase acting on lactose and sucrase acting on lecture 1

Enzymes help speed up chemical reactions in the body. They affect every function, from breathing to digestion. Lipases, for example, help digest fat. Enzymes only work in certain conditions. If Enzymes accomplish this by lowering activation energy which is the energy required for a chemical reaction to proceed. The rate of chemical reactions can be altered by changing pH, temperature   This makes new enzymes available to bind to the substrate. When all of the substrate molecules are attached to enzymes, increasing the enzyme concentration will no longer speed up the reaction process. The extra enzymes added will not have any spare substrate to work on, and the reaction rate remains level at the maximum :// Read the latest chapters of Methods in Enzymology at , Elsevier’s leading platform of peer-reviewed scholarly literature

  The existence of enzymes has been known for well over a century. Some of the earliest studies were performed in by the Swedish chemist, Jon Jakob Berzelius who termed their chemical action catalytic. It was not until , however, that the first enzyme was obtained in pure form, a feat accomplished by James B. Sumner of Cornell   Enzymes are subject to influences by local environmental conditions such as pH, substrate concentration, and temperature. Although increasing the environmental temperature generally increases reaction rates, enzyme catalyzed or otherwise, increasing or decreasing the temperature outside of an optimal range can affect chemical bonds within the   The receptors can lie, for example, on the surface of the cells opposite the nerve terminal ().The interaction of a neurotransmitter (agonist 2) with its receptor usually effects a change in conformation of the macromolecular receptor, leading to a change in enzyme activity within the cell (), and/or movement of ions into or out of the cell (). Publisher Summary. This chapter focuses on enzymes and their general properties. An enzyme, or ferment, is a definite chemical substance of organic nature, thermolabile and elaborated by plants, animals and microorganisms, and capable of increasing the velocity of a chemical reaction without being used up in the process, or becoming a part of the product ://